Internship Positions 2021-2022

Orange Swallow is looking for enthusiastic individuals to join the team, starting from the latter half of the year.
Interested in an internship position? Take a look at the description below!

Bridging Asia/China and the Netherlands

Do you want to be a connector between Asia/China and the Netherlands? Are you adventurous, ambitious and eager to show your skills in tackling some of our business challenges, as a consultancy, during the pandemic? And do you like to contribute actively, share your opinions and ideas?
Then this might be the internship for you!

As an intern, you will act as an assistant to our team in day to day business as well as develop new opportunities. Your tasks will include:

project management
You are outgoing and an active and flexible brainstormer and explorer. You will work with the team on renewing the strategy of our company, the acquisition of new projects and offer support in ongoing projects. You are expected to share your ideas, and take the initiative to set up new things. You will be assisting in sourcing, matchmaking and brokerage and possibly create business cases around horticulture, smart city, and circular economy.

Communication and Social Media
You are in charge of organizing the communication channels, and creating appealing content for our website and blogs. We work with WordPress and Chinese social media.
You will develop content around events and business themes to connect Asian and Dutch businesses in times of the pandemic.

About you

  • You are enrolled in a business related study, like Marketing, International Business or Communication Studies, on university or HBO level in the Netherlands.
  • You are proficient in English and preferably Mandarin. Dutch is a plus.
  • You have knowledge of Chinese, Asian and Western business customs.
  • You are an experienced user of Chinese social media and preferably also WordPress.
  • You can think positively, conceptually and strategically, but you can also be hands-on.
    You like to venture into new directions and are excited to put them into practice.
  • You have an entrepreneurial mindset and you enjoy communicating with (prospective) clients.
  • You are a strong team communicator, but can also work independently as a skilled multitasker.
  • You are (preferably) available for 5 to 6 months, 4 days a week.

About Orange Swallow

We are an ambitious young company in a dynamic market in the field of business consultancy (and travel), with a focus on China/Asia. We specialize in serving organizations and businesses on both sides, that want to develop their projects and build cooperative relationships. We support them in all business matters, such as market research, development of entry strategies, preparation of fact finding visits and matchmaking, and of course with all travel arrangements.

Allowance: € 300-450

Location: Leiden

Preferred start:  as soon as possible

Interested? Please respond with your motivation letter, CV and availability details to k.goebel@orangeswallow.com.


February 2021 Internship positions

Bridging Asia/China and the Netherlands

Do you want to be a connector between Asia/China and the Netherlands? Are you adventurous, ambitious and eager to show your skills in tackling some of our business challenges, as a consultancy, during the pandemic? And do you like to contribute actively, share your opinions and ideas?
Then this might be the internship for you!

As an intern, you will act as an assistant to our team in day to day business as well as develop new opportunities. We are currently looking for 2 new interns:

  • Scope : project management
    You are outgoing and an active and flexible brainstormer and explorer. You will work with the team on renewing the strategy of our company, the acquisition of new projects and offer support in ongoing projects. You are expected to share your ideas, and take the initiative to set up new things. You will be assisting in sourcing, matchmaking and brokerage and possibly create business cases around horticulture, smart city, and circular economy.
  • Scope: Communication and Social Media
    You are in charge of organizing the communication channels, and creating appealing content for our website and blogs. We work with WordPress and Chinese social media.
    You will develop content around events and business themes to connect Asian and Dutch businesses in times of the pandemic.

About you

  • You are enrolled in a business related study, like Marketing, International Business or Communication Studies, on university or HBO level in the Netherlands.
  • You are proficient in English and preferably Mandarin. Dutch is a plus.
  • You have knowledge of Chinese, Asian and Western business customs.
  • You are an experienced user of Chinese social media and preferably also WordPress.
  • You can think positively, conceptually and strategically, but you can also be hands-on.
    You like to venture into new directions and are excited to put them into practice.
  • You have an entrepreneurial mindset and you enjoy communicating with (prospective) clients.
  • You are a strong team communicator, but can also work independently as a skilled multitasker.
  • You are (preferably) available for 5 to 6 months, 4 days a week.

About Orange Swallow

We are an ambitious young company in a dynamic market in the field of business consultancy
(and travel), with a focus on China/Asia. We specialize in serving organizations and businesses on both sides, that want to develop their projects and build cooperative relationships. We support them in all business matters, such as market research, development of entry strategies, preparation of fact finding visits and matchmaking, and of course with all travel arrangements.

Allowance: € 300-450

Location: Leiden (physical meetup in the office after lockdown)

Preferred start:  Mid-February 2021

Interested? Please respond with your motivation letter, CV and availability details to k.goebel@orangeswallow.com.

Dutch Design Week 2020: Building a Sustainable Future  

A Picture of Dutch Design Week 2019

 

When it comes to design style, many people would think of the scandinavian style — clean, concise, simple lines and minimalism. While scandinavian design holds staying power, other types of design are thriving too, such as the Dutch design. Dutch design is experimental, innovative, minimalist, unconventional and with a sense of humor. These features are seen everywhere in the Netherlands, such as  in cities like Eindhoven and Tilburg — the breeding grounds of the Dutch design.  

Every year in October, Dutch Design Week (DDW) —  the biggest design event in Northern Europe — takes place in Eindhoven. Due to the pandemic, DDW was held in the form of an online festival this year. Despite this, it presented us with great works, ideas and exhibitions from talented designers worldwide. One of the areas that DDW 2020 focused on is sustainability. This blog will illustrate how sustainability — another important characteristic of Dutch design — is embedded in Dutch products. We will review some of the relevant topics and interesting exhibitions mentioned during the event and discuss how to build a sustainable future for us and also for the generations to come. 

 

DDW 2020: Embassy of Rethinking Plastics 

Plastic brings us so much convenience in our daily life, but also causes considerable damage to the environment. It litters the land, blocks the waterways and clogs up the oceans. Statistics show that plastic production worldwide has increased to more than 9 billion metric tons since the 1950s and approximately 5 billion metric tons have ended up as waste. Moreover, the recycling of plastic was not available even in developed countries until the 1980s. How to deal with a large amount of plastic waste is a serious challenge that needs to be tackled urgently. The “Embassy of Rethinking Plastics” section in DDW 2020 addressed this question in detail and illustrated a few examples in which plastic waste is turned into valuable raw materials used in green and sustainable products. 

 

A screenshot of the virtual tour about Rethinking Plastics at DDW 2020

 

A 30-min virtual tour was provided for people who are interested in plastic products. The audience could explore the exhibition using the arrow keys on the keyboard. Listening to the pleasant and relaxing background music, you could wander around and encounter the latest designed objects made from recycled plastic waste. Detailed information about the designer, the product or the inspiration can be found when clicking the info icon. The exhibition contained more than 20 objects and showed us what a plastic fantastic world would look like if we have innovation design. 

Among all the examples, the Dutch company Dutchfiets stands out. After a long period of designing and testing time, the company successfully achieved their goal — to produce bicycles that are made of 100 percent recyclable plastics and that do not end up as waste. This latest model has ergonomic grips, integrated rechargeable lights, and 100% recyclable plastic unibody and wheels, and is designed to be indestructible and low in maintenance. After a successful crowdfunding campaign, Dutchfiets can now be found not only in the Netherlands but also abroad. As Johannes Alderse Baas, the founder of Dutchfiets, says that Dutch bicycles are actually not only bicycles but a concept of circular mobility (“The DutchFiets is eigenlijk niet eens een fiets, maar een circulaire mobiliteit concept”). This concept not only contributes to a sustainable society but also raises people’s awareness of environmental protection.   

 

DutchFiets, the circular bicycle made of recyclable material

 

Similar to the company DutchFiets, the material designer Paula Nerlich presented us with her innovative and unconventional circular biomaterials made from food surplus. Aiming to support the elimination of food waste, she created new materials like COCOA. COCOA is made with 40% waste from industrial chocolate production and other vegan and composable ingredients. The material is solid and water-resistant with a shiny surface. Even though it is still under development, COCOA shows great potential for 3D-printing. Besides, Paula offers virtual workshops, teaching people to make their own circular materials from food waste at home. 

Turning unwanted waste into valuable materials is a great way to preserve our environment but definitely not the only way. Different from DutchFiets, the company Greenify makes contributions to a sustainable society by offering us an online platform for green products. Understanding that buying is voting, Greenify strongly advises people to purchase green products that are friendly to society. They aim to create the largest open database where people not only share their knowledge about sustainability but also rate, compare and promote sustainable products. They believe that simply choosing green is the most direct and effective way to build a sustainable future.

 

Introducing Greenify

 

DDW Talk: Sustainable Products

Apart from plastic waste, another commonly used material — glass which is often seen as a better choice than plastics — was also discussed in the section DDW Talk: Sustainable Products. Two main problems about glass were mentioned. The first one is that as the main raw material of glass, sand is becoming more and more scarce. Even though we see sands everywhere around us, not all types of sands can be converted into glass products.  The shortage of high quality sands pushes us to think about how to recycle and reuse glass to a greater extent. Secondly, the current technology is not advanced enough to recycle all types of glass. Different types of glass have their own characteristics, colors and melting temperatures, and therefore cannot be treated in the same way. Despite all the effort put into glass recycling, there is still a long way to go. 

Building a sustainable future is a huge project that needs everyone’s contribution. The Dutch Design Week this year reminds us again how important it is to preserve our environment by introducing new ideas about sustainability and new green products like Dutchfiets. Hopefully, we will work together to create a zero waste and sustainable world in the near future. 

Want to read more about circularity and sustainability? Check this out: The Circular Economy: Implementing a New Economic System in the Netherlands and China. Or you can contact us for more information about circularity in the Netherlands. 

 

The Circular Economy: Implementing a New Economic System in the Netherlands and China

 

The planet is excessively overloaded not only with the large population but also with an increasing amount of trash and waste we make every single day. We are urgently faced with the challenge: how to cope with waste so we would not be running out of energy and materials too quickly, and at the same time, keep the environment friendly for us to live. In order to overcome this difficulty, the transition from the traditional ‘take-make-waste’ linear model to a more sustainable circular economy has to be accelerated. This blog will illustrate what a circular economy is, how to achieve it, and what measures the two frontrunners — the Netherlands and China have taken to implement a circular economy. 

 

What is a circular economy? 

Often considered as the economic system of the future, the concept of a circular economy is becoming more and more popular nowadays. Different from the widely used “take-make-waste” linear model, circular economy aims to be environmentally friendly based on three principles: design out waste and pollution, keep products and materials in use, and regenerate natural systems. It attempts to create a closed loop in which the value of raw materials, components and products can be maximised by intention and design. 

A good example might be sharing cars. Sharing means there will be less demand for car consumption, which reduces the use of raw materials in car manufactory. The broken parts of a car can either be repaired or further processed into raw materials again to make new cars. Clearly, this loop makes the best use of materials and produces waste as little as possible. Under this circular economy, we are able to preserve the environment and gradually build a green and sustainable future. 

Explaining the Circular Economy and How Society Can Re-think Progress | Animated Video Essay

 

How is a circular economy becoming a reality?

Implementing a circular economy is a big project that needs collaboration between at least three parties: product designers and manufacturers, governments and the public. Each group can make their own contributions to the implementation of a circular economy. 

When it comes to waste and pollution, design is partly to blame but it can also offer solutions. Actions like using green materials and making components repairable and reusable can effectively solve the problem. During the recently held Dutch Design Week 2020, the company Dutchfiets presented us with their latest bicycles made of 100 percent of recyclable plastics that would not end up as waste. Many other companies are also taking actions to help reduce waste. Another great instance would be Pieter Pot who delivers groceries in glass jars instead of plastic bags and other types of packaging, and then collects the empty jars for reuse. Working together with their customers, the company keeps the glass jars in use for as long as possible. 

Deliver food in glass jars instead of plastic bags

Apart from product designers and manufacturers, the consumption mindset of the public also has to change. To bring about a more circular economy, we urgently need to consume less and make our choices more wisely. It is presently common for people to purchase unnecessary goods in order to meet their insatiable material desires; thought is too rarely given to just how disastrous overconsumption actually is to our environment. Thinking twice before buying is something the public must learn if the goal is to build a sustainable society. 

Lastly, governments and intergovernmental organizations also have a role to play in accelerating the transition to a circular economy. Many countries, including the Netherlands and China, have set up plans and implemented laws to reach this goal. Organizations such as the United Nations, the European Union (EU) and the G7 have achieved agreements to take necessary measures. With the involvement of governments, a circular economy is more likely to become a reality. 

 

Frontrunners in the implementation of a circular economy

Many countries are striving to implement a circular economy, and some of them are moving far ahead. The next two sections will illustrate what the two frontrunners Netherlands and China have done in order to shift to a circular economy. 

Circular economy in the Netherlands 

Dutch people are rather ambitious to establish a world without waste. Early in 2016, the central government launched an important program, aiming to build a 100% circular society by 2050. But before that, the nation will need to halve their consumption of primary raw materials by 2030. Two years later, transition agendas were set up in 2018, prioritising five sectors in the Netherlands: biomass and food, plastics, manufacturing, construction and consumer goods. These sectors were expected to make a great contribution to a waste-free society with measures taken appropriately. For instance, circular design should be introduced and encouraged in the manufacturing industry in order to decrease the use of metals and reduce its severe damage to the environment. In general, the Dutch government made these transition agendas to provide guidance on how the sections mentioned above could become circular by 2050 on a national level. 

On the local level, the Dutch regions and cities also show initiative to transition into a circular economy. One of the largest projects combating plastic trash is the Great Bubble Barrier that was successfully implemented in 2019 in Amsterdam after a long researching and testing period. Pumping air through a tube with holes at the bottom of the IJssel River, a wall of bubbles is formed which directs the plastic waste to the riverside for collection instead of letting them flow into the North Sea. This smart solution effectively prevents the plastic trash from polluting the oceans and allows fish and ships to pass freely at the same time. 

The Bubble Barrier: a smart solution to plastic pollution

 

Circular economy in China 

When it comes to a circular economy, China is definitely a frontrunner. This concept was first introduced to China in the 1990s. This new sustainable development strategy aims to tackle the problems of environmental pollution and source scarcity by making a better use of resources and energy. Just like the Dutch government, China attaches great importance to the circular economy by adopting financial measures and legislation. In 2018, the government set up the Circular Economy Promotion Law to spur this economic system, making China a leading country in this respect.

Under the guidance of Chinese government, local companies and organisations endeavor to facilitate the circular economy. Guangzhou Huadu Worldwide Transmision is a remanufacturing company in Southern China. It focuses on the gearboxes and other automotive transmission systems, and produces 35,000 remanufactured units every year. With its own repair and service centers as well as its skilled technicians, Huadu successfully turns old and worn products into new and well-functioned ones. Moreover, Huadu is one of the few companies entitled to receive the subsidy from the Trade Old for Remanufactured Scheme which gives customers a 10% discount when trading worn products for remanufactured ones. 

Companies like Huadu are thriving in China, contributing to a sustainable society. Apart from the above mentioned examples, sustainability is also implemented in other ways. Restaurants in Suzhou are required to send their food waste to Jiangsu Clean Environmental Technology where the organic waste is used to grow insect protein. In addition, several second-hand marketplaces, such as JD reuse platform, were set up for the public to sell or exchange their goods. 

 

Summary 

A circular economy is the economic system of the future and will, due to its distinct advantages, replace the conventional linear model. In times of source scarcity and environment deterioration, implementing a circular economy is not only necessary but also urgent. Today’s blog takes the Netherlands and China as two examples and reviews how they facilitate circular economy respectively. However, changing an economic system is never easy. Despite all the attempts and effort, there is still much room for improvement in both countries and worldwide.  

Orange Swallow has experience and expertise in the field of circular economy and can offer consultancy services if you wish to engage in this field either in China or the Netherlands. Contact us to see what we can do for you! 

Why Enter Europe Through the Netherlands? Reason 1: Highly Educated and Multilingual Workforce


Often viewed as the “gateway to Europe” for Chinese nationals, the Netherlands ranks among the most dynamic and competitive economies in the world, and one of the best countries for business investment. With a rich tradition in culture and trade, the Netherlands plays a lead role in international trade and is often the first choice for business expansion and investment. To the question of why so many foreign companies enter Europe through the Netherlands, there is definitely more than one answer. This blog introduces one of the biggest advantages of this country: its highly educated and multilingual workforce, something rarely seen in other countries.

 

Dutch people are well-known for their outstanding language abilities. Most Dutch people are Dutch-English bilinguals and many are multilinguals able to speak several foreign languages other than their mother tongue to a working degree. The Netherlands is the top English-speaking country outside the Anglosphere, with 90-93% of the population speaking fluent English. It seems that English is no longer a foreign language in this country. Besides their English proficiency, 71% Dutch people speak German, 29% speak French and 5% speak Spanish according to national statistics (ONS). The multilingual environment facilitates excellent communication between people from different countries and cultures, making the Netherlands a standout choice for any company entering the European marketplace.

 

Apart from being multilinguals, Dutch people are often well-educated and highly skilled employees. Dutch higher education is known for its exemplary quality. According to the Times Higher Education’s World University Rankings 2021, the Netherlands houses 13 top-class public universities, 7 of which are ranked in the top 100 universities in the world. Moreover, the enrolment rate in higher education is up to nearly 85% in the Netherlands, with 37% of the Dutch working population earning a higher university education degree. There is no doubt that the Netherlands boasts fantastically educated employees with valuable expertise across various fields and industries.

The Top 7 Dutch Universities Based on the Times Higher Education’s World University Rankings 2021

 

Equipped with a wealth of professional knowledge gained as part of their educational curriculum, Dutch university graduates become very competitive in the labor market. A total of 10 universities in the Netherlands appear in the Global University Employability Ranking 2019, also published by Times Higher Education. The top three Dutch universities for graduate employability – Delft University of Technology, Erasmus University Rotterdam (EUR) and Leiden University – each offers something unique.

 

1. Delft University of Technology

As the leading Dutch university in the graduation employability rank, Delft University of Technology provides students with a variety of opportunities to connect with businesses as well as governmental and civic organizations, allowing them to apply what they have learned in class into practice. At this university, constructive partnerships with companies are equally important as in-depth knowledge and cutting-edge creativity.

TU Delft Library from Creative Commons.org


2. Erasmus University of Rotterdam

Erasmus University of Rotterdam (EUR) is an internationally oriented university with a strong social orientation in both education and research. EUR has earned an excellent reputation for its pragmatic approach, entrepreneurial vibe, and a “make it happen” mentality that helps students and researchers to pursue their ambitions in a wide range of areas such as wealth management, health, governance, and cultural enterprises. Consequently, it is consistently ranked in the top 2% of the world’s best universities.

Erasmus University of Rotterdam

 

3. Leiden University

Founded in 1575, Leiden University is the oldest university in the Netherlands. It is located across two vibrant student cities: Leiden – the home of Orange Swallow – and The Hague. 28,100 students from 120 different countries worldwide are enrolled, with such diversity explaining the university’s claim to be “a place of refuge where any question can be asked and answered in complete freedom”. Leiden University leads the way in various fields ranging from natural sciences, life sciences, medicine, social sciences to international law, astronomy and non-Western languages.

Academy Building of Leiden University

 

International Chinese Business Events: the Old and the New

As the whole world is shaken by the impact of the pandemic, the virus has forced everyone to move towards a different path, finding their place in the new “normal”. The business world has been hit hard. Meeting with professionals around the world, and making new connections directly, have become things of the past for many. But the inability to meet in person has enabled new formats of business events, with a blend of on-and offline characteristics, to emerge.

In November last year, Orange Swallow was in an entirely different situation: travelling for business, and meeting prospective partners and acquaintances abroad. During our previous business trip to China, we visited Shanghai and Jinan to participate in international business matchmaking events and exhibitions of the CIIE and SMEC. Sadly, this year we won’t be able to visit the venues in person. Although unable to do so, it does not mean we’ll have to miss out entirely!
As we’re approaching a series of business events in October-November, Orange Swallow looks back at last year’s experiences, while looking forward to the approaching ones!

CIIE

In November 2019, the large-scale event CIIE (China International Import Exhibition) took place in Shanghai. Orange Swallow was honored to receive an invitation of the Bank of China to participate in their matchmaking event during the CIIE. Head of Orange Swallow,  Hedda Sasburg, and Junior Project Manager, Kimberley Goebel, represented the company as formal exhibition visitors.

A great number of companies was spread out over the matchmaking venue with their own tables, while also having the possibility to personally set up matchmaking appointments elsewhere on the matchmaking venue. The staff fervently supported us by finding suitable matchmaking partners and provided skillful interpreters to help translate when needed. Another thing that caught our eye was the fact that the enormous venue exhibited a multitude of products relating to a great variety of industries. Exhibition booths of the food industry, smart vehicles, design and other industries, could all be found there. This made for a unique and interesting experience.

On the 6th of November, during the signing ceremony, Orange Swallow signed MOU’s with some of the interesting companies they had the pleasure of meeting, thereby declaring their intention for cooperation.

During this edition of CIIE, Orange Swallow also visited the stands of different Dutch companies and got to know more about their work philosophies and experiences. These companies were Beaudelor Cosmetics, DMQ, PromZAsia, Senz, Jordex, Port of Rotterdam, D&D, La Gro advocaten. Later that day, all the Dutch participants gathered for a small get-together on the venue.

having an imaginary drink with some of the Dutch exhibitors
It was a pleasure having a lunch break with some of the Bank of China staff

SMEC

After CIIE, we participated in the SMEC (SME Cooperation Conference) Conference, in Jinan.  SMEC consisted of three parts, of which the first was the official presentations of organizations and companies. The presentations were about Jinan’s High Tech zone and its potential for business, which gave us a good overview of the status of the area, and what kind of developments we can expect in the future.

Since all the participants stayed at the same venue,  it was convenient to create networking possibilities among the international participants. However, we particularly looked forward to the matchmaking event. The SMEC staff aided us by linking us to Chinese companies and organizations that suited our requirements the best. We were delighted to have the opportunity to meet them, to understand their needs and to discuss possible cooperation.

a group photo of the Dutch participants

We were assisted by excellent interpreters from local universities, guiding us through the matchmaking program. We also received an event booklet with the information of all the companies and organizations present for the matchmaking. In case we wanted to meet with specific companies, the staff aided us in setting up appointments.

together with one of our interpreters

During the last day of the SMEC, we visited companies and their workspaces, which we applied for beforehand. Hedda visited a company in the life sciences industry, while Kimberley visited a company in the smart city industry. It was a great way to take a closer look at some of the industries that are flourishing in Jinan and understand how they organize their production.

Hedda joining the life science track
work space viewing during the smart city track

During this trip, we gained a lot of insights and results. We experienced China’s broad-minded attitude towards the outside world, and met many friendly and welcoming Chinese business representatives. It was a fruitful trip during which we’ve met many interesting companies and organizations, with whom we are excited to work with.

Approaching Events

Because of the current pandemic, we sadly won’t be able to visit these events in person. However, as hybrids of online and offline events have become increasingly popular, we are looking forward to attending them virtually the coming months.
Below are the Chinese trade and matchmaking conferences we’ll be attending this year :


CIFTIS    1 September – 1 June 2021
https://en.ciftis.org/

As its name alludes, CIFTIS (Chinese International Fair for Trade in Services) is focused on connecting international companies and organizations by supporting trade in services, while providing the most comprehensive Chinese exhibition of the service industry.
Although the offline event already ended in September, the cloud version will still be available until the 1st of June 2021. This means that companies from all over the world can still have access to the fair and engage in business talks with participating companies. There is a special virtual page taking you to the exhibition venue, where you can browse the stands and their products.
   
Canton Fair     15 – 24 October 2020
https://www.cantonfair.org.cn/en/

The Canton Fair, or the Chinese Import and Export Fair, showcases all different types of products with its aim to mutually boost the internal and international markets. In the online demand and supply catalogue, you can take a look at the best products companies from different industries are showcasing. What is interesting is that as a “buyer”, you can also make requests for a specific type of products, through which the system will then link you with possible interesting products for you to view. On the homepage of a company, you can contact them directly by chat, or by scheduling an appointment.

CIIE matchmaking   5- 19 November 2020
https://www.ciie.org/zbh/en/

The first edition of CIIE was organized in 2018. The four wings of its enormous 4-leafed clover-shaped venue houses a great variety of product exhibitions, interactive booths and seminars. The CIIE sadly does not have a cloud version for companies that cannot travel to the venue in person. However, we do have the possibility to participate in the matchmaking event organized by the Bank of China again. Of course, this time it will be the online edition. We’re looking forward to meeting new companies and get to know more about their products and requests. If you are curious about how we can represent your company during the matchmaking, don’t hesitate to contact us!

SMEC  19-20 November 2020
http://pc.smecjinan.com/

SMEC is organized yearly by the Jinan Innovation Zone in Shandong province. Its goal is to stimulate exchanges between Chinese and foreign companies and organizations, while also educating the participants of the business potential of the area, as well as the developments of the Innovation Zone. We will be attending the matchmaking event again, albeit the virtual edition. We’re curious to learn more about what companies have been up to during these times, as well as what new developments we can expect in the area.


Of course, these are just a few examples of the hybrid online and offline events that will be hosted in the coming months. We are eager to see how this new format of events will function, and to catch up with other companies during these unconventional circumstances.

For those who are curious about what these events can mean for you, please check out the links in the descriptions.
With our Chinese speaking team, Orange Swallow is ready to assist you with any questions or representation of your company during these events.

We wish everyone a fruitful participation, and a fun and new experience!